To be Original or not to be? credit: http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/filepicker%2FcbOetEO5QGOofWKKSrWH_originality.jpg What defines something as original? According to the video series “Everything’s a Remix” (http://everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/ ), nothing starts out original. Everything we make is just a variation or combination of something that has already been made. This is where our creativity is put to use. There are three basic elements that make up creativity. The first is copy, the second is transform, and the third is combine. Many inventions or major advances has been made by using these elements. The printing press, model T, and world wide web are just to name a few. All of these are made up of a combination of things that were already invented. This is why we say copying is how we learn. Another example is the type righter, which was created from the idea of the piano. If the piano was never made, maybe the type righter would have never been made. The making of the type righter was taking an idea and creating a variation. Perhaps, a hot topic in popular culture is the ‘copying’ of films. I think most people don’t realize how heavily the box office relies on existing material. In fact, 74 out of 100 films made yearly are considered sequels, remixes, or adaptions. Many filmmakers are interested in turning the old into something new. Here are some film ‘adaptations’ that are popular today: 1. The Pirates of the Caribbean movies were adaptated from a theme park/ ride. 2. Hairspray, the movie, was written after the musical, which was made after the original movie. 3. The Transformers movies were based off an animated T.V. show, which was created based off toys. 4. Julie & Julia, the movie about Julia Child is based off a book, which was based off a blog. The sequels that have made are more obvious than the adaptations. Popular ones include the James Bond movies and Star Wars. There are numerous elements of Star Wars that were previously used in other movie and books. To make and come up with ideas for Star Wars, George Lucas took many different materials and transformed them into his own. Lucas believes that creation requires influence and that everything we make is a remix of existing creation, our lives, and lives of others. Perhaps, this is why Star Wars is so popular. Here are a few questions to think about: 1. Do you think originality in film exists? 2. If so, can you name some examples and what makes it original? 3. Do you consider sequels/remixes/adaptations to be copies? 4. Does creativity require the basic elements (copy, transform, combine)? credit: http://firm-guide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Quote-of-the-day-George-Lucas.jpg http://flavorwire.com/380153/10-authors-who-loved-the-film-adaptations-of-their-books/10 Here is another interesting article, “10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books” credit: http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/filepicker%2FcbOetEO5QGOofWKKSrWH_originality.jpg What defines something as original? According to the video series “Everything’s a Remix” (http://everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/ ), nothing starts out original. Everything we make is just a variation or combination of something that has already been made. This is where our creativity is put to use. There are three basic elements that make up creativity. The first is copy, the second is transform, and the third is combine. Many inventions or major advances has been made by using these elements. The printing press, model T, and world wide web are just to name a few. All of these are made up of a combination of things that were already invented. This is why we say copying is how we learn. Another example is the type righter, which was created from the idea of the piano. If the piano was never made, maybe the type righter would have never been made. The making of the type righter was taking an idea and creating a variation. Perhaps, a hot topic in popular culture is the ‘copying’ of films. I think most people don’t realize how heavily the box office relies on existing material. In fact, 74 out of 100 films made yearly are considered sequels, remixes, or adaptions. Many filmmakers are interested in turning the old into something new. Here are some film ‘adaptations’ that are popular today: 1. The Pirates of the Caribbean movies were adaptated from a theme park/ ride. 2. Hairspray, the movie, was written after the musical, which was made after the original movie. 3. The Transformers movies were based off an animated T.V. show, which was created based off toys. 4. Julie & Julia, the movie about Julia Child is based off a book, which was based off a blog. The sequels that have made are more obvious than the adaptations. Popular ones include the James Bond movies and Star Wars. There are numerous elements of Star Wars that were previously used in other movie and books. To make and come up with ideas for Star Wars, George Lucas took many different materials and transformed them into his own. Lucas believes that creation requires influence and that everything we make is a remix of existing creation, our lives, and lives of others. Perhaps, this is why Star Wars is so popular. Here are a few questions to think about: 1. Do you think originality in film exists? 2. If so, can you name some examples and what makes it original? 3. Do you consider sequels/remixes/adaptations to be copies? 4. Does creativity require the basic elements (copy, transform, combine)? credit: http://firm-guide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Quote-of-the-day-George-Lucas.jpg http://flavorwire.com/380153/10-authors-who-loved-the-film-adaptations-of-their-books/10 Here is another interesting article, “10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books”

credit: http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/filepicker%2FcbOetEO5QGOofWKKSrWH_originality.jpg

What defines something as original? According to the video series “Everything’s a Remix” (http://everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/ ), nothing starts out original. Everything we make is just a variation or combination of something that has already been made. This is where our creativity is put to use.

There are three basic elements that make up creativity. The first is copy, the second is transform, and the third is combine. Many inventions or major advances has been made by using these elements. The printing press, model T, and world wide web are just to name a few. All of these are made up of a combination of things that were already invented. This is why we say copying is how we learn.

Another example is the type righter, which was created from the idea of the piano. If the piano was never made, maybe the type righter would have never been made. The making of the type righter was taking an idea and creating a variation.

Perhaps, a hot topic in popular culture is the ‘copying’ of films. I think most people don’t realize how heavily the box office relies on existing material. In fact, 74 out of 100 films made yearly are considered sequels, remixes, or adaptions. Many filmmakers are interested in turning the old into something new.

Here are some film ‘adaptations’ that are popular today:

1. The Pirates of the Caribbean movies were adaptated from a theme park/ ride.

2. Hairspray, the movie, was written after the musical, which was made after the original movie.

3. The Transformers movies were based off an animated T.V. show, which was created based off toys.

4. Julie & Julia, the movie about Julia Child is based off a book, which was based off a blog.

The sequels that have made are more obvious than the adaptations. Popular ones include the James Bond movies and Star Wars. There are numerous elements of Star Wars that were previously used in other movie and books. To make and come up with ideas for Star Wars, George Lucas took many different materials and transformed them into his own. Lucas believes that creation requires influence and that everything we make is a remix of existing creation, our lives, and lives of others. Perhaps, this is why Star Wars is so popular.

Here are a few questions to think about:

1. Do you think originality in film exists?

2. If so, can you name some examples and what makes it original?

3. Do you consider sequels/remixes/adaptations to be copies?

4. Does creativity require the basic elements (copy, transform, combine)?

credit: http://firm-guide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Quote-of-the-day-George-Lucas.jpg

http://flavorwire.com/380153/10-authors-who-loved-the-film-adaptations-of-their-books/10
Here is another interesting article, “10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books”

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20 thoughts on “To be Original or not to be? credit: http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/filepicker%2FcbOetEO5QGOofWKKSrWH_originality.jpg What defines something as original? According to the video series “Everything’s a Remix” (http://everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/ ), nothing starts out original. Everything we make is just a variation or combination of something that has already been made. This is where our creativity is put to use. There are three basic elements that make up creativity. The first is copy, the second is transform, and the third is combine. Many inventions or major advances has been made by using these elements. The printing press, model T, and world wide web are just to name a few. All of these are made up of a combination of things that were already invented. This is why we say copying is how we learn. Another example is the type righter, which was created from the idea of the piano. If the piano was never made, maybe the type righter would have never been made. The making of the type righter was taking an idea and creating a variation. Perhaps, a hot topic in popular culture is the ‘copying’ of films. I think most people don’t realize how heavily the box office relies on existing material. In fact, 74 out of 100 films made yearly are considered sequels, remixes, or adaptions. Many filmmakers are interested in turning the old into something new. Here are some film ‘adaptations’ that are popular today: 1. The Pirates of the Caribbean movies were adaptated from a theme park/ ride. 2. Hairspray, the movie, was written after the musical, which was made after the original movie. 3. The Transformers movies were based off an animated T.V. show, which was created based off toys. 4. Julie & Julia, the movie about Julia Child is based off a book, which was based off a blog. The sequels that have made are more obvious than the adaptations. Popular ones include the James Bond movies and Star Wars. There are numerous elements of Star Wars that were previously used in other movie and books. To make and come up with ideas for Star Wars, George Lucas took many different materials and transformed them into his own. Lucas believes that creation requires influence and that everything we make is a remix of existing creation, our lives, and lives of others. Perhaps, this is why Star Wars is so popular. Here are a few questions to think about: 1. Do you think originality in film exists? 2. If so, can you name some examples and what makes it original? 3. Do you consider sequels/remixes/adaptations to be copies? 4. Does creativity require the basic elements (copy, transform, combine)? credit: http://firm-guide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Quote-of-the-day-George-Lucas.jpg http://flavorwire.com/380153/10-authors-who-loved-the-film-adaptations-of-their-books/10 Here is another interesting article, “10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books” credit: http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/filepicker%2FcbOetEO5QGOofWKKSrWH_originality.jpg What defines something as original? According to the video series “Everything’s a Remix” (http://everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/ ), nothing starts out original. Everything we make is just a variation or combination of something that has already been made. This is where our creativity is put to use. There are three basic elements that make up creativity. The first is copy, the second is transform, and the third is combine. Many inventions or major advances has been made by using these elements. The printing press, model T, and world wide web are just to name a few. All of these are made up of a combination of things that were already invented. This is why we say copying is how we learn. Another example is the type righter, which was created from the idea of the piano. If the piano was never made, maybe the type righter would have never been made. The making of the type righter was taking an idea and creating a variation. Perhaps, a hot topic in popular culture is the ‘copying’ of films. I think most people don’t realize how heavily the box office relies on existing material. In fact, 74 out of 100 films made yearly are considered sequels, remixes, or adaptions. Many filmmakers are interested in turning the old into something new. Here are some film ‘adaptations’ that are popular today: 1. The Pirates of the Caribbean movies were adaptated from a theme park/ ride. 2. Hairspray, the movie, was written after the musical, which was made after the original movie. 3. The Transformers movies were based off an animated T.V. show, which was created based off toys. 4. Julie & Julia, the movie about Julia Child is based off a book, which was based off a blog. The sequels that have made are more obvious than the adaptations. Popular ones include the James Bond movies and Star Wars. There are numerous elements of Star Wars that were previously used in other movie and books. To make and come up with ideas for Star Wars, George Lucas took many different materials and transformed them into his own. Lucas believes that creation requires influence and that everything we make is a remix of existing creation, our lives, and lives of others. Perhaps, this is why Star Wars is so popular. Here are a few questions to think about: 1. Do you think originality in film exists? 2. If so, can you name some examples and what makes it original? 3. Do you consider sequels/remixes/adaptations to be copies? 4. Does creativity require the basic elements (copy, transform, combine)? credit: http://firm-guide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Quote-of-the-day-George-Lucas.jpg http://flavorwire.com/380153/10-authors-who-loved-the-film-adaptations-of-their-books/10 Here is another interesting article, “10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books”

  1. I would say that yes, originality does exist. I would have to say recently though, it is hard to find. I cannot personally think of any examples at the moment that I would say are “original”. As I try to think, most things are adaptations from books or stories. Even some of the Disney films about princesses were tales of the Grimm Brothers from the 19th century. I don’t that sequels are copies. I would have to say often times remakes are sort of copies with just modern twists or technology. I don’t think that creativity requires basic elements. Creativity has no rules or forms.

  2. Originality in a lot of areas doesn’t really exist anymore and film is a great area to focus on this fact. I do believe there are many original elements in film but mostly indie films that aren’t viewed by the mass public. If you focus on mainstream film you would be hard-pressed to find literally anything that isn’t an adaptation, remake or rip-off of something in the past. The problem in my opinion is that the studios of movies in particular, see this formula as something that is successful because of the money these films make. If people are going to go see bad remakes for special effects or sequels trying to milk every scent of something that may have had originality at one point, than they will continue to make them. The big action 3D superhero films dominate despite a lack of originality or creativity. Or look at the Hangover franchise for this point, the cranked out two sequels because of how successful the first one was. Or look at the Saw series, the very first film was one of the most unique horror films and it has become the most redundant, greedy movie sequel franchise maybe ever. So it is hard to find originality but if you are open minded you can still find it in non-mainstream film.

  3. I would think originality still exists in film. One of my favorite movies, Inception, is extremely unique and I really haven’t seen another film that closely resembles it. I really don’t know how many scenes are based on other films, but I would still call it original. Inception has an awesome story line that is truly unique and can be interpreted in so many different ways. However, I do think that films based off of comics or books are copies, but they shouldn’t be looked down upon because of that. They still offer great stories that many people wouldn’t have been aware of if they weren’t made into film. A lot of the times, when movies are based off of books, comics, etc. they don’t keep everything the same; they might add plots or characters, or they might remove them. People should still read or look at the original source of the film if they want to be truly immersed in the story.

  4. I do think that originality exists in film. Even if the film is a remake the directors and producers change it up a bit. For example a new movie that was just remade was The Great Gatsby. I watched the original version, and even though the story lines and the plot is the same the characters are different, and they were filmed almost forty years apart. I think that each film is original is its own way. The setting, the characters, and the overall story. I think that films that are based on a true story make the film a bit more unique. For example, The Blind Side was such a great film, and it was very original in it’s own way. I do not consider sequels, remixes, or adaptations to be copies. To me copying a movie would be watching the same exact thing twice, and when your watching a remake or sequel your seeing different things happen. I do believe that creativity requires the three basic elements copy, transform, and combine. In order to make a film original and unique you need those three components.

  5. Originality in films does exist, it’s just not as obvious as some other things may be. You actually have to look for it, and find it. For example, take the movie the Hunger Games. Sure, there was a book written about it, but movies only get the plot line from the books. They change up so much more because the book is much longer than the movie. This movie is original because it leaves us anticipating for more. I don’t think sequels are copies. I think they are just adding onto something that was already so great. Same goes for remixes they are taking a song and giving it some of their own originality. Anything you do needs to have the basic elements. Creativity is something some people lack and it’s because they don’t imagine.

  6. I suppose it depends on how originality is defined. Netflix’s use of big data to develop and bring House of Cards to market would suggest that consumer reaction to historical films and shows is a good predictor of success and given the dollars required to bring video to market, perhaps the safe play is to borrow with pride from the past. That said, one could argue that Netflix’s idea to use big data in entertainment was innovative and original, unless you argue that they simply stole the idea the marketing industry. As the readings suggest, our society has evolved my delivering incremental improvements to existing ideas, that is why we are advancing so much more quickly in the digital age where ideas can be shared and expanded up in a dynamic manner. I believe innovation and ideas are limitless and not bound by a finite number of creations, but I know that the more creations that are documented, the more likely it will influence the creation of other content

  7. I guess originality is in the eye of the beholder. Yet, I believe it is original to come up with new ways to view existing pieces of work. A good example of this is the transformation of the non-fiction book The Orchid Thief, by Susan Orlean, a true story about a guy who loves orchids and adapting the story into the movie Adaptation, written by Charlie Kaufman (note the play on the film’s name) it’s beyond original and brilliant. I’m not thinking of the movie as brilliant, so much, but the originality needed to create it. In the case of The Orchid Thief, rights to the book were bought and no copyright infringements took place.

    So to take the essence of one thing and completely transform it to something similar, yet completely different is creative.

  8. I think movies of today can have the chance to be original because even though they make take a few ideas from a plot from a book, someone can turn that plot into a movie adding new aspects. Remixes and sequels are not copies as long as the author transforms the original piece of work into their own. For example, the movie “Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking your Juice in the Hood” comically combines the events of what happens on various movies such as “Boys N the Hood”. Don’t Be a Menace was not a copy of the movies it parodied, but instead added a comical twist to the movie. Creativity comes from 1.your brain and own original thought and/or 2.using an idea as a blueprint for your new idea. For example, Girl Talk was very creative in producing mash ups of many artist songs. Even though the songs were not his, he developed an entire new song .

  9. 1. Do you think originality in film exists?
    I think there is still originality to be found in films. Though most movie premises, plots, and themes are not new, the presentation of them can be very original. Even something original requires inspiration. A creator must draw from what he experiences in life, or has witnessed in his surroundings. Since other movies or forms of media are an integral part of people’s lives today, it makes sense that themes and premises are reused in movies. I am not an avid movie watcher, but I have found that director Christopher Nolan has very original movies. Though his movies are often based on another movie or book (The Batman series, The Prestige, etc.) he always presents new elements into the story. His movie inception, though similar ideas have been done in the past, was also very novel.

    I think copy, transform, and combine covers most of creativity. However, there are some elements that could only be brought out by the lens in which the creator sees the world. If I could add a word to the list, it would be interpret. Creativity rests on individuals interpretation of the world, or the subject they are creating.

  10. I think there is still originality to be found in films. Though most movie premises, plots, and themes are not new, the presentation of them can be very original. Even something original requires inspiration. A creator must draw from what he experiences in life, or has witnessed in his surroundings. Since other movies or forms of media are an integral part of people’s lives today, it makes sense that themes and premises are reused in movies. I am not an avid movie watcher, but I have found that director Christopher Nolan has very original movies. Though his movies are often based on another movie or book (The Batman series, The Prestige, etc.) he always presents new elements into the story. His movie inception, though similar ideas have been done in the past, was also very novel.

    I think copy, transform, and combine covers most of creativity. However, there are some elements that could only be brought out by the lens in which the creator sees the world. If I could add a word to the list, it would be interpret. Creativity rests on individuals interpretation of the world, or the subject they are creating.

  11. I’ve personally seen things from disney, granted its the same company, but from the jungle book and winnie the pooh, there is a scene that is simply changed from spring to a swamp setting, but the picture is exactly the same. I think that sequels and the like aren’t original because the story or idea wouldn’t make any sense without the first one being there. But for the most part, even if things aren’t original, they are relatively hard to see.

  12. The idea that originality no longer exists is true in some ways and not so true in others. If you look at the big picture of a movie the main plot of the movie. (i.e.. for a romantic comedy Single awkward man meets an attractive and funny woman. They date and the guy blows it. Guy makes a miraculous come back and gets the girl.) Yes all the stories have been told. You would be hard pressed to find an arch that has not been covered at least once. But the creativity comes in on a lower level. The creation of characters, the events that create the main plot points, the dialogue. I feel that plenty of creativity is overlooked in this world due to a cynical outlook on films today.
    I do not see sequels as copies as long as they are innovative and not iterative. The biggest example of this is in the Video Game market. With games like Call of Duty who put out a new game every year but change almost no core game play mechanics yes they are a copy of their successors. But in the case of sequels like Assassins’ Creed new mechanics are introduced a in almost every game that has dramatically shifted the game play between the first title and the latest releases.

  13. I do think there is some originality left in film. When something is original I think it involves a personal story or a societal critique that has yet to be told, or told in an accurate fashion. I think an example of an original television series is The Wire. Though this is a drama concerning the police it develops characters in all sectors of the drug trade including politicians. No other television series has given every single character a profound and developed voice.

    I do not consider sequels or remakes to be complete copies because even though they are using something that has been done before because it still requires a bit of originality and a new interpretation to make a different version. Though the base idea is the same, the rest or something new would be different.

    And yes, creativity does require the basic elements. Though something can be original, there is always something before that may have inspired them to make new material. It just changes where it can be considered their own or something new.

  14. First of all, nice title. I do think that originality in film exists. No two films are identical, while some may have a common theme, plot, or feel to it. I think the movie cowboys and aliens is pretty original. I’ve never seen another quite like it. It was a combination of many themes so you can say it’s a copy but that’s just stupid. Anyone who uses a camera to make his movie is copying the first guy. People need to stop getting so theoretical about these movies. They are meant to entertain, make you feel, and make you think. They do so for most people effectively. I don’t think sequels etc. are copies, but merely a continuation. Creativity really does require those. No matter what form of art or expression, something is being mimicked, yet originality is still present.

  15. Personally I don’t think that originality in film exists very much anymore. It seems like the tyrants of the film industry keep feeding us the same stuff over and over. How many more Spider-man movies can we watch with the same story line over and over? But I also think it would be immature to think that there isn’t a beacon of originality in film. If a movie is made from a book, that doesn’t automatically make the movie a non-original. I personally as a movie goer I like to see some of my childhood favorite books like Life of Pie come to life. That’s just me personally though.

  16. Re-mixing is completely different from homage or adaptation. Of course we don’t exist in a vacuum so everything stands on the shoulders of what came before. However, if you are writing, producing, shooting a movie adaptation of a novel you are still creating the look and feel and tone of the piece. A remix, wherein some goof places fart noises over a scene from Star Wars, is not exactly comparable to shooting a movie. It’s apples and oranges. I feel that ‘Everything’s A Remix’ makes excuses for the current popular aesthetic of ‘whatever I shit out on my laptop is gold because nobody pays attention to anything anymore.’ At least, people should know from whom they are stealing.

  17. Originality is hard to find now. No one wants to take risks on something new anymore. It’s far more viable to do remakes or sequels than to come up with something fresh and new. I mean, how many Fast and the Furious sequels do we really need?

    I think you make an interesting argument about what being creative really means. Everything is a copy of something that has been done before. There should be more of an emphasis on putting a fresh twist on it, rather than repeating the same old story over and over again. That’s what makes something truly creative!

  18. Originality in film is hard to find. The only time you see something slightly new is with Indie movies and the obscure Oscar nominated films. Even then, you see repetitiveness. The problem is that it’s all been done before now. It’s easier for the industry to back a film sequel (if the first one is a hit) or a remake because they know it will mostly likely draw a crowd.
    The Hollywood industry doesn’t like to back “at-risk” obscure films. The reason why? Because they want to make money. They think, why should we back a film that will make 2 million dollars when we can support a movie that will make 97 million. Hollywood is all about recycling. They want something they know will make money in the end. Why do you think there have been 23 James Bond 007 movies? Lord knows we don’t need another one, but they’ll continue to recycle the same plots because they know it will rake in the cash. Because of this, the new, exploratory, fresh films are pushed to the side and sometimes never get made because of lack of money/support. It’s really an unfortunate thing.

  19. While it’s easier to copy and vary things that already exist, I disagree with the heart of your article because humans have the ability to create or design complex systems that have never been seen before. However, these days it seems to be only about redesigning (doing it better) something that has already been discovered or invented. That’s why we have so many inventions like TV, radio, light, internet etc.. Films tell stories and occasionally, some originality exists….like in Pulp Fiction. The ending was told at the beginning and the story went “forward (backward)” from there. Sequels and mixes aren’t true copies because they don’t replicate the exact same story and exact same set of characters, i.e. not all the variables are present in order to make an exact replica of the previous story, movie, etc….Creativity doesn’t always require the three basic elements of copy, transform and combine because you could be faced with a unique problem that inspires a creative solution never before seen by yourself. For example, I saw a unique need for our semitrailer drivers needing to lift and unload their trailers. Without ever having seen models of how a solution could be reached, I created a landing gear unique to these types of trucks that was able to lift and lower the trailer without the truckers’ having to go outside and do this. In this case, there was nothing that I had to use as a copy nor transform or combine.

  20. As a eighties baby I have seen the decline of originality in film, but I have seen a rise in creativity and originality. What I mean is that a lot of movies I watched like Dirty Dancing, Color Purple and Goonies were original. Yes , Color Purple was a book adaptation, it was still an original screenplay. After Goonies aired a book was released, does that make the book unoriginal? No it makes it the original written version of the movie.
    Sequels are in no way a copy, they are just a continuation of the first part of the story. For example, the Lord of the Rings trilogy. All of them had the same theme, but were different from the first.
    While people say originality is a lost art you have to look the remakes and originality that different perspectives can present of the originals. Check out the two Scarface movies with Paul Muni and the other with Al Pacino and the two Dr. Dolittles with Rex Harrison and the other with Eddie Murphy.

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